Reading Aloud in Math Class

So I’ve been informally experimenting with the effect of reading aloud in math class.

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Many years ago, I noticed that when a student couldn’t get started on a task on their own, they’d raise their hand and claim “I don’t know what to do.”  I would ask, “Well, what did the problem say?”  The student would then answer, “I don’t know.”  My next step would then be to read the problem aloud and ask “What do you think you’re supposed to do?”  The student would respond to this question…and most often with the correct response.

I didn’t need to ask the students any questions related to the math at hand.  They just needed to hear the problem aloud.

I started to pay attention to this back and forth that I would have with countless numbers of students.  And then began to explore the question-what if they read aloud to themselves???

An eight grade honors level student came to find me because she couldn’t figure out a problem she had on an assignment.  I said read the problem.  She said “I already did.”  I asked her to read it aloud to me.  I could see the lightbulb go off when she finished and she asked “Am I supposed to _______?” And she was correct!

Two nights ago, my fourth grader that was accepted into the STEM program in our district, was working on an online assignment in the other room.  He came out to my husband and I and asked for help because he was stuck.  He sat down next to my husband and began reading the problem out loud to him.  As soon as he finished, he said, “Oh, never mind! I know what to do.”

I’ve noticed that I will often put my fingers on my ears and read-aloud in a whisper if I’m trying to double check the words that I’ve written.  It’s helpful to hear myself.  How can we explore this more with students?  How can we incorporate this in our classrooms?

I did a quick search attempting to find research on this topic.  I noted this article about reading aloud for English language learners.  But what was interesting was this:

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I’m interested in researching this further and would definitely love to know if anyone has had similar experiences with their students.

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Teach Math as a Story

 

I had the opportunity recently to complete peer observations outside of my content area. I scheduled a half day of observations with a sixth grade social studies teacher new to our building.  We observed in two eighth grade social studies classrooms and one sixth grade classroom.

If you’ve never observed outside of your content area I highly recommend it.  I think it forced me to pay closer attention to the general instructional practices, rather than focusing in on the content.

In the sixth grade classroom the teacher began by reviewing what the students discussed in the previous class.  They were in the middle of learning about Julius Caesar and the fall of the Roman Republic. The students eagerly answered her questions and were incredibly engaged with the “story” she was telling.

I was engaged with the story, intrigued by the cast of characters and happenings that she described.  The students were making predictions about what would happen next and the teacher responded, “just wait…maybe we’ll see today…”

The students knew the characters in this story, they understood how they related, they recalled the parts of the story that were told to them in the previous class, they made predictions about what would happen next. The teacher also knew this story, oh so well, that she could add on interesting and important details and maintain the curiosity that she had sparked.

I wondered…can we teach math as a story?

I decided to Google “Teach Math as a Story” and the first result was this.

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It is an excerpt from a book and it’s mostly about using stories in the math classroom, but it has useful think-a-bouts like this…

“In our description of how to teach mathematics, we are not concerned with fictional stories about the topic, but rather we are concerned with how we can shape the topic to enhance its attraction to students. In doing this, we will not be falsifying anything, or giving precedence to entertaining students over educating them. Instead, we will be engaging them. We see engaging students with mathematical activity as a crucial aspect of successful education as, and it is the real vividness and importance of this subject in which we want to engage students.

In summary, the great power of stories, according to Kieran Egan (1986, 2004, 2008), is in their dual mission: they communicate information in a memorable form and they shape the hearer’s feelings about the information being communicated.”

I did some additional searching through Peter Liljedahl’s work and found this interesting article that seems related to what teacher planning might look like in order to teach math as a story.

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In this article, Zazkis and Liljedahl contrast a typical lesson plan to what they’ve termed a lesson play.

“In terms of the pedagogical features of the lesson play, we wish to draw attention to some aspects of its format. The structure of the lesson play – as a dialogue occurring overtime with possibilities for different points of view – allows for the portrayal of the messy, sometimes repetitive interactions of a classroom. This structure stands in stark contrast to a necessarily ordered and simplified list of actions such as: take up homework, state definition, provide examples,give problems, and evaluate solutions.”

Crafting a lesson play provides for the improvised interactions that may occur with teaching math as a story-being able to respond and shift according to responses from students.


I don’t think any of this is dissimilar from the ideas in books such as 5 Practices,  but I now have a different analogy that I’m considering. As I continue the thinking that I’ve started here, I want to keep in mind these things in terms of how I work with the math teachers in my building:

  1. On the macro level-How can I help teachers to tell the math story as a set of interconnected ideas and concepts?
  2. On the micro level-How can I help teachers to consider a lesson play, so that the day to day story is just as interesting as the year long story they are telling? How do we get students to want more?

 

Things that make you go hmmmm…..

Well….this is an interesting place to be.  I’m not sure about how I feel about putting my thoughts out there for the world, but I do love the fact that this community exists.

I came here because I am just as intensely obsessed with education as all of these people that have already begun their journey in the reflective world of blogging.  I like to say that education is not only my “job” but my hobby.  Most of my friends and colleagues (even occasionally my husband) do not understand that.

I enjoy ALL things education…

  • Special Education
  • Math Education
  • Professional Development about Education
  • Curriculum Writing
  • Universal Design for Learning
  • The list can go on…

But…first and foremost, I just plain old LOVE MATH.  I’ve loved math my entire life.  I can’t remember having a bad teacher…only teachers that made me love math more.

I even majored in math for my undergraduate degree and didn’t work towards education until my graduate degree.

Interestingly…my very first teaching job was at a place called The Harbour School (this is a non-public special education facility for students K – 21).

This was the best professional development that I have ever experienced…teaching math to ALL of the students that entered the high school portion of the program–students with Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, Learning Disabilities, Cerebral Palsy, Speech and Language difficulties, etc.  I taught students that were community based…but also students that worked towards your typical advanced math classes.

So, I am certified in both secondary math and special education.  But, now I work in a public middle school in southern Maryland.  This school pulls from Title I elementary schools and serves underprivileged students.  I work as an Instructional Resource Teacher in my building…and work daily with teachers and students.

So, all of these experiences have created the lens through which I view all things math education.  I love to absorb it ALL!